Health Parameters

pH:

  • What is it?
    • pH measures how acidic or basic something is.
  • What do your levels mean? 
    • pH ranges from 0-14, with 7 being neutral. Below a 7 is acidic, and above a 7 is basic. Your kidneys maintain your urine's pH, with levels ranging from 6.5-7.
  • Why keep track of it? 
    • Out of balance pH can be indicative of several diseases. Adding changes in your nutrition can help neutralize your pH, and provide you with the many health benefits that come with it, such as an increase in cardiovascular health, energy, and prevention of kidney disorders.

Hydration:

  • What is it? 
    • We measure the Specific Gravity (SPG), which is the density of your urine compared to that of water. SPG not only measures how hydrated you are, but also how well your kidneys are functioning and the presence of metabolic disorders.
  • What do your levels mean? 
    • Urine’s SPG values fall between 1.002 and 1.030. Values higher than 1.010 indicate mild dehydration. High SPG values that don’t change with fluid intake could mean improper functioning of your kidneys. Low SPG could be a sign of a rare condition such as diabetes insipidus, which causes thirst and excessive diluted urine production.
  • Why keep track of it? 
    • If you identify abnormal levels, you can prevent both acute and chronic dehydration.

Glucose:

  • What is it? 
    • Glucose is a type of sugar that your body needs and uses as energy.
  • What do your levels mean? 
    • The normal amount of glucose in urine ranges between 0-0.8mmoles/L (millimoles per liter). Moderate to high levels of glucose in your urine are indicative of metabolic disorders, with the most common one being diabetes.
  • Why keep track of it?
    • Using glucose levels in urine as a measure of glycemic status can screen for potential metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes.

Ketones:

  • What is it? 
    • Ketones are chemicals that your body produces when it metabolizes fats. When not enough sugar is available for your cells to use, your body switches energy currencies and goes from using glucose to fats, which in turn makes you produce ketones.
  • What do your levels mean? 
    • Our test looks at an acetoacetate (Ketone A). The values of this ketone in urine ranges from 0-160 mmol/L (millimoles per liter). Normal levels range from 0-20 mmol/L, moderate levels are between 30-80 mmol/L, and high levels are >.80 mmol/L. Normally there aren’t ketones in your urine, as only a small amount are present in the bloodstream, but being on a keto diet can cause them to spill into your urine.
  • Why keep track of it?
    • Regularly testing can help you reach your dietary goals, stay in ketosis, and help detect diabetes early on and prevent the serious complications associated with it.